The History Of Rhythmic Education Throughout The Ages

So what are the beginnings of music? Did our forefathers start by pounding objects together to generate rhythm or by singing with their voices? What were the tools they used? Has music always been such a significant part of human culture, and if so, why? These are among the questions we have about rhythmic education and how it evolved through the ages.

So let’s take a tour down history lane and clear some clouds on these questions.

What Exactly Is Music?

This is a tricky question to answer since everybody has their own viewpoint. For example, Jeremy Montagu of the Oxford university characterises music as a “sound that expresses emotion.” Using such definition, a mother trying to sing or humming to soothe her newborn would most likely be considered music, yet this basic melody would have signified speech.

Therefore, where do we draw the distinction separating music and speech? You may assume that it’s rhythm, pattern, and pitch control—and you got it right!

Rhythm, pattern, and pitch control are a crucial aspect of music. Our forefathers may have produced rhythmic music by clapping their hands. This might be traced back to the first musical instruments when someone discovered that banging sticks or stones together doesn’t cause as much pain in the hands.

Since then, rhythm and music evolved in many respects, along with the dynamic changes experienced by civilisations brought about by technology. Today, musicians enjoy a wide variety of tools to make the most out of rhythm and music.

Song Rhythm Tracks—A Breakthrough In Creating Rhythm Tracks

Particular to playing the drums, one great example is Song Rythm Tracks. It’s an app that allows for creating collections of rhythm tracks used as a backing in playing songs. With Song Rhythm Tracks, one needs to adopt a unique approach to creating rhythm tracks unfamiliar to a prospective user. The application uses bar numbers to indicate where drumming breaks occur.

“Using the app, I find it much quicker to use and more valuable than other alternatives. For instance, when my band and I pick a track to play, the arrangement is displayed as, say, “3 choruses of 32 bar AABA with a 4-bar intro’ and an 8-bar ending”. From that, we know straight away what the drummer will be playing. The app also makes us play along the track correctly,”

says music enthusiast and CEO of Credit Capital Alister Clare.

Why Use Song Rhythm Tracks?

Educating musicians about song form is a challenge that requires some technical content—that cannot be avoided. However, song form should not be a difficult concept. It’s essentially counting the number of bars in sections, which is where some musicians might struggle. Song Rhythm Tracks takes the burden away so you can jam, sing, and play your heart out.

Moreover, you’ll always have great background tracks on your phone or iPad with track listings and a player. Song Rhythm Tracks are high-quality rhythm backing tracks that are simple to use. You will not be required to sequence anything.

Plus, the user interface will make you love to use it again and again. With that, you will have a greater appreciation for your music, and you may decide to incorporate these tunes in your singles and album releases. Don’t let terrible experiences with some other mobile drumming apps deter you. The Song Rhythm Tracks are perfect for learning a new song, jamming, performing, or recording your current album.

Get That Perfect Rhythm For Your Song Using Song Rhythm Tracks

Music existed and continues to exist because it draws people together. So the next time you’re learning a new tune or excited to have a solid jam with your friends, never forget your phone or your iPad.

Song Rythm Tracks by Alive Drumming offers a streamlined and easy-to-use solution for your needs of getting that perfect rhythm. Take what Alive Drumming’s clients say about the app and contact them if you need help.

  • By Jude Young, contributing author.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.